» Physical Therapy : Neurological Impairments
Physical Therapy

Neurological Impairments

Physical therapy for neurological impairments specializes in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with movement problems due to disease or injury of the nervous system. Neurological impairments, which may be helped by physical therapy, may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Vascular Disorders – Cerebral Vascular Accidents (Stroke), Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA), Cerebral Hemorrhages or Hematomas
  • Brain Injury resulting from trauma or conditions such as tumors
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Gait Disorders, especially imbalances causing falls
  • Structural or Neuromuscular Disorders – Bell’s Palsy, Cervical Spondylosis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Peripheral Neuropathy, Polyneuropathies, Muscular Dystrophy, Myasthenia Gravis, Guillain-Barré Syndrome
  • Infectious Diseases – Meningitis, Encephalitis, Polio, and Epidural Abscess
  • Functional Disorders – Headaches, Seizure Disorders, and Neuralgia
  • Vestibular Disorders – Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV), Ménière’s disease, Labyrinthitis, Vestibular Neuritis, Acoustic Neuroma, or other conditions that cause dizziness and loss of balance
  • Degenerative Disorders – Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s Chorea, and Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Pediatric Conditions such as Spina Bifida or Cerebral Palsy

Neurological physical therapy treatments may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Gait Training
  • Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF)
  • Mobility Aids
  • Neuromuscular Reeducation: series of exercises and techniques to improve balance, coordination, kinesthetic sense, posture, and muscle tone through pain reduction and the creation of new movement patterns
  • Postural and Ergonomic Corrections: behavior modification, exercise, and self-awareness
  • Vestibular rehabilitation: an exercise-based program designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficits